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Play’n GO has committed to closing all physical offices by October 2024 as the Swedish slots supplier switches to a fully remote operating model.

The firm’s London location shut down in late 2022, while the Budapest building shuttered in May of this year. The Manila office will be next and is scheduled to close its doors in October.

The company was able to pilot the initiative after rapidly growing its UK-based headcount during the Covid-19 pandemic, where the workforce effectively outgrew the office.

That trial was described as a “major success” by Play’n GO chief people officer James Trusler, who said the ability to hire staff away from office locations had been “transformational” for the group.

For example, Play’n GO has since recruited employees from all over the UK – including in Scotland and Wales – and is no longer reliant on the narrow pool of potential employees that live within commuter distance of London.

“On the face of it, the decision was very easy,” Trusler told iGaming NEXT. “Our colleagues weren’t coming into our offices in any significant numbers after they opened up again after the pandemic.

“This would have been a problem that needed addressing if we saw that productivity and engagement were down, but for Play’n GO specifically, the vast majority of our employees were absolutely thriving digitally.

“They really appreciated the benefits of digital-first experiences – saving time and money on commuting, being able to spend more time with their families, or being able to dedicate more time to their personal wellness.

“This would have been a problem that needed addressing if we saw that productivity and engagement were down, but for Play’n GO specifically, the vast majority of our employees were absolutely thriving digitally.”
Play’n GO chief people officer James Trusler

“From a business perspective, it doesn’t make too much sense to have enormous offices that aren’t being utilised, but any potential financial benefit from physical space closure was the last point of consideration on our list when taking this decision,” he added.

While job losses traditionally follow office closures, Play’n GO’s pivot has had the opposite effect. The company is at a record headcount of 750, and is hiring for 30 open vacancies.

The supplier has also committed to paying employees a monthly allowance towards the cost of constant internet usage while working from home.

Play’n GO’s strategic decision comes against a backdrop where the future of remote work is under close consideration.

After being born out of necessity during the Covid-19 pandemic, commentators have started to question whether working from home is a sustainable operating model for the future.

Productivity, operating expense and employee wellness are all central factors of that debate, which most would agree has no right answer and at present is down to employer preference.

According to data from LinkedIn, more than a third of UK workers said they would quit their jobs if their employer demanded they return to the office full-time.

Elsewhere, the European Union has this week moved to strengthen the rights of remote workers after 30 EU lawmakers signed a non-binding agreement.

The charter, launched by the Future Workforce Alliance, would ultimately enable access to co-working spaces, prohibit the tracking of staff computers from home, and protect workers from having to send or respond to work emails outside of working hours.

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